3D Printing material for your application in different industries

Since its inception in the 1980s, additive manufacturing, generally known as 3D printing, has gone a long way. As a technique for quick prototyping, 3D printing has now expanded to include a wide range of other technologies. The number of firms using 3D printing has grown rapidly during the last several years. Tooling aids, visual and functional prototypes, and even end-use components are examples of use cases and applications that differ by industry.

As 3D printing’s potential uses grow, businesses find new ways to use the technology to generate new business models and possibilities. Throughout this article, we’ll look at the present status of 3D printing in various industries and how it’s being used. This article aims to provide you with an in-depth overview of how 3D printing and the best 3D printer are used to generate innovation and corporate success via real-life examples.

A look at the application of 3D printing materials in the automotive industry

For automobiles that are 3D printed, polymers, metal, and composite materials are the most often utilized raw materials. We’ll go through each of them in further depth now. The automotive sector uses a wide variety of 3D printed polymers, and plastics are utilized more often than any other material in 3D printing technologies. Selective layer sintering (SLS), fused deposition modelling (FDM) and stereolithography are the most prevalent ways of 3D printing plastics (SLA). ABS filaments, one of the most often used polymers for 3D printing automotive parts, are frequently found in the vehicle’s bodywork. FDM methods are often used to 3D print ABS.

If you’re looking for something that’s both flexible and shock-resistant, then this thermoplastic is an excellent option. As a result, it can resist temperatures between -20 and 80 degrees Fahrenheit, which is well within the range of temperatures that an automobile is likely to encounter. It is a reusable material that is also readily weldable. Biodegradable polylactic acid (PLA) is made from essential renewable resources and is frequently used in manufacturing. PLA is one of the simplest materials to 3D print since it doesn’t need a heated platform. On the other hand, ABS needs a heated platform and cannot be degraded.

Metal-based 3D printing is a relatively new phenomenon in the automobile business, but it’s starting to pick up steam. Powder bed and wire-feed electron beam printing are some methods that may be used to print metals. Alloys and pure metals like aluminium are used in the deposition of metals. Melting the metal or metal alloy is required before printing. Lasers are essential because metals melt at high temperatures. Layers of molten metal may be placed and allowed to harden after the metal has been transformed into a liquid. Many manufacturers feel that the procedures will become more common even though they are now mainly employed for small batches of spare and prototype components.

 

The application of 3D printing materials for Medical & Dental

Manufacturing personalized prostheses and orthodontics, implants, customized anatomical models for surgery preparation and anatomical research models are only some of the medical industry’s 3D printing uses.

  • Nylon

In addition to being lightweight, corrosion-resistant, and chemically resistant, nylon PA 12 (Nylon) is very flexible. Rigid and pliable, it has an excellent strength-to-weight ratio. Ethylene oxide, chemical, gamma irradiation, gas plasma, and steam autoclave may sterilize nylon PA12. MJF or SLS 3D printing is used to make it. Nylon PA12 meets both ISO and USP Class I–IV standards regarding medical-grade nylon, making it a popular choice for prosthetic limbs.

  • ABS

Thermoplastic ABS is another common material in the medical field. It’s biocompatible and can be sterilized by gamma irradiation, ethylene oxide, and gas plasma in addition to being sterile. This material is generally ISO certified and USP Class I–IV approved for medical equipment and precise anatomical models. Other uses include making prostheses. ABS’s tensile and impact properties make it a challenging material to work with. FDM printing is used to make it.

  • PC

Moulds, prototypes, and customized surgical guides are often made from this material. Though the finish of PC is inferior to that of the Nylon PA12, the material is very long-lasting and can handle temperatures up to 500°F (260°C). PC may also be sterilized using gamma irradiation and ethylene oxide for a limited period. FDM is used to produce printed copies of PC.

  • AFPM

In a nutshell, AFPM uses a layer-by-layer material flow rate control based on the shape of the component. The filament deforms in the gear system during high-speed 3D printing. With no automatic material flow management, 3D printers exhibit a minor slip in their system that may result in a total or partial blockage of their hot-ends. Consequently, prototype, small-batch 3D printing end-use, and functional components take longer to produce.

  • Polyetherimide (ULTEM 1010)

One of the strongest and most heat and chemical resistant FDM thermoplastics available, ULTEM 1010 has a competitive advantage over its competitors. Sterilization methods include gamma irradiation, ethylene oxide, gas plasma, and steam autoclave; they are also biocompatible. Surgical guides, prototypes and prostheses may be printed using ULTEM 1010, a 3D printer.

 

Final Thoughts

With 3D printing advancing rapidly, we may expect to see many more fascinating possibilities in the future. The technology’s full potential is just beginning to be realized. However, as more and more organizations move towards more innovative and digital production. We know the importance of 3D printing, and 3D Printer manufacturer in India will only grow.

If you are exploring the best 3D printer and 3D printing service, then Divide By Zero is one of the best options that provide high-quality 3d printing services.

 

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